Case study: Creating an easy to use Listener Guide for the Samaritans and the Prison Service

Through its Listener Scheme in prisons, Samaritans  provides  emotional support to prisoners who are struggling to cope, are self harming or are feeling suicidal.

Guidance for Samaritans volunteers that run and support Listener schemes was contained in a hard copy manual (the Guide to Prisons) which was cumbersome to update, difficult to navigate and not in a format that made it easy to share with prison staff. As a result, over the years, volunteers referred to it  less and less frequently meaning that consistency in delivery of the Listener scheme across the prison estate was being compromised.

Cherryleaf were tasked with converting the manual to a fully searchable, easy to use, online resource that would link to other relevant information on the Samaritans intranet and could also be made available on the Prison Service intranet. The new online Guide to the Listener scheme means that both Samaritans volunteers and prison staff have access to the same, up to date, comprehensive set of guidelines and information.

Maria Foster, Samaritans’ Prison Support Officer said:

“For Samaritans volunteers, having the information available on the intranet rather than in a manual in their branches, means they can find out what they need to know at any time; the search facility and page style ensures that information can be located and read quickly and easily.

For prison staff, this is the first time they will be able to see all of the Samaritans guidelines for running the Listener scheme; this will help to further develop their understanding of the scheme and will support them in facilitating the operation of the scheme in their prison.

Samaritans is delighted with the result of the project;

Cherryleaf understood the brief and very quickly got to grips with the subject matter, turning a cumbersome manual into a streamlined user friendly resource.”

 

The Samaritans provides confidential emotional support for people who are experiencing feelings of distress, despair or suicidal thoughts. You can talk to them, any time, on 08457 909090 (UK), 1850 60 90 90 (Republic of Ireland) or jo@samaritans.org .

Voltaire, typos, and the jitters – writing the IBM Style Guide

This guest post is from Peter Hayward of IBM (UK):

Voltaire said that “the art of medicine consists in amusing the patient while nature cures the disease.” Technical editing is a bit like practising medicine. It has a focus on both prevention and cure, except we don’t have nature on our side. With editing, nature tends to maintain the status quo; if the doctor doesn’t attempt the prevention and provide the cure, the disease persists. Writers need some sort of guidance to help them through the minefield of trying to write consistently, clearly, and concisely, while still following all the rules that editors seem to enjoy imposing.

Like many organisations, IBM has made up its fair share of rules and guidelines. A council of about 15, drawn from across the company’s writing community, is charged with looking after them, making sure they stay consistent and up to date. These guidelines have been available internally for many years, but we recently recognised that this accumulated wisdom might have a use in the wider world of technical writing.

So a sub-group of editors from that Style and Word Usage Council set about turning the guidelines into something fit for publication, removing all the boring internal bits, making sure we didn’t upset any sensibilities, or run foul of our legal overseers.

IBM uses DITA markup these days for most technical documentation, so we decided to follow suit with our scribblings. As well as providing our text to the publishers in that format, we were able to transform it daily into HTML and put it in a structured help system (“information centre”) based on Eclipse so that we could keep track of what we were doing.

I guess that to a big publisher, our little book was just one more title on their list. We naturally saw it as much more. Although, thinking about it, such a book actually is different from other titles, which is making me just a little apprehensive. If you want to use trendy jargon, you could say it’s a “metabook”, writing about writing, which means that you’re inevitably setting yourself up for a fall. If you spot a typo in most books, it’s usually little more than an annoyance. Typos and mistakes in books that purport to tell the reader how to write properly, invite a rather different response.

So if you do get your hands on a copy of the IBM Style Guide (“available from all good bookshops”), please be gentle. We tried to persuade the publishers that it was you, discerning author, who we were writing for, and not your average “punter”. OK, so it’s not fair to pass all the blame for errors to these editors’ editors. But I’m a little nervous. Of course it’s full of good stuff, well written and without blemish. Really it is. But I just have this feeling, that as the very first copy I handle falls open at random…

Cherryleaf launches new course on editing and proofreading


We’ve just introduced a new classroom training course on editing and proofreading.

This course is aimed at individuals who have to create text and documents as part of their day to day work. They are not professional copywriters but may be called upon to provide reports, leaflets, instructions, fliers or web copy as part of their daily activities. This course covers the basic principles of providing coherent and engaging writing – and how to check its suitability for purpose and accuracy.

See our “Editing and Proofreading Course” Web page for more details.