Dates for our next advanced technical writing & new trends course

training room

Here are the dates for our next advanced technical writing & new trends course:

  • The next public classroom course will be held on 28th January 2016, at our training centre in central London (SW7).
  • A live Web course, for delegates based outside the UK, will be held on 6 & 7 January 2016 (2 x 3 hour sessions).

Discover the advanced new writing styles emerging in technical communication by attending Cherryleaf’s popular training course. Don’t get left behind: past clients include technical communicators from Citrix, GE, IBM UK, Lloyds Banking Group, Sage plc, Schlumberger, Tekla and Visa International.

See Advanced technical writing & new trends in technical communication training.

Five predictions for technical communication in 2016 and beyond

It’s not quite 2016 yet, but here are our five predictions for technical communication in 2016 and beyond.

Please note:

Here are our predictions:

1. As documentation becomes to be seen more as part of product design, so the technical writing process will become part of the product development process

We’re likely to see reviews and version control follow the developers processes, and be managed via tools such as Git.

2. Markdown will break out from being an authoring format for developers and into the mainstream

Markdown offers separation of look and feel, variables, topic-based authoring and single sourcing, in a tools-neutral, simple to use, format. At a push, you can also do conditional publishing, too (information typing is lacking, though). Because it is used by developers themselves, we’re likely to see the tools develop at a rapid pace, and become more powerful and easier to use.

3.  More technical communicators will use Lean methods when working in an Agile environment

Lean is something we’ve been discussing for a number of years, and seems to have picked up as a new topic at conferences recently.

4. We’ll see greater use of the imperative voice in topic titles

We explored this earlier in the year – The decline of the gerund in technical documentation?

5. The popular Help authoring tools will be able to generate embedded Help and on-boarding screens

This is more a wish, but it wouldn’t surprise us if the Help authoring tools will enable authors to single-source Help text that will be embedded in the UI itself or appear within on-boarding screens.

Your predictions?

Do you agree? What you see as future trends? Use the Comments box to let us know.

Cherryleaf’s Trends/Advanced Technical Writing Techniques – Next course 10th November 2015

Cherryleaf’s next Trends/Advanced Technical Writing Techniques course will be held on the 10th November 2015, at our training centre in central London (SW7).

This course is for you if you are an experienced technical communicator who wants to know about the current trends and ideas. Don’t get left behind: past clients include technical communicators from Citrix, GE, IBM UK, Lloyds Banking Group, Sage plc, Schlumberger, Tekla and Visa International.

Software companies are not selling boxes anymore

Wistia’s Chris Savage has written an article on how the company focuses on articulating its company vision to differentiate itself in a competitive marketplace.

In the article, he states:

“To buy software back in the day, you’d go to the store, buy a box, and bring it home. Inside of the box would be a shiny CD, which had your new program on it.

You’d install the program on your computer, and then you’d use it for a few years. When the next version came out, maybe you’d get a discount because you bought the previous version. If it had some good upgrades, you’d consider making a purchase.

That’s all changed.

Now when you’re buying software, you’re not getting a static product. You’re buying something that’s continually evolving and changing. At Wistia, like most SaaS companies today, we deploy fixes and improvements multiple times per day.

When we buy software today, we’re not just buying into the current benefits, features, and price. Instead, we’re making a bet on the product’s future.”

Customers expect a continuing relationship with companies. They expect the product to grow, to see an ecosystem to evolve. Interwoven into this, is the support they receive. They expect high quality information when they want to explore how to get more out of the product, or troubleshoot any issues. This means User Assistance, the online Help, must become part of the initial design, and part of the user experience. It can no longer be an afterthought bolted on once the product has been developed.

Protecting your brand using technical communication

Lisa Thomas

On BBC Radio 5 live’s Wake Up to Money programme today, Lisa Thomas, Chief Executive of advertising agency M&C Saatchi, said:

“We can’t just think about just one advert. We have to think about the brand and the relationship that consumers have with that brand, and be aware that consumers see your brand and your product everywhere now.

They can have a very direct relationship with that brand, whether that’s via Social Media, whether that’s via just by being more in more contact with those brands and the business, so there’s more imperative now to think holistically about the brand than before, and be more creative.”

The co-presenter, Mickey Clark, commented that he’d heard from David Kershaw (a director at M&C Saatchi)  that even the through the toughest economic times, companies are anxious still to protect their brands, even if they have next to no money.

Brand means the customer’s expectations of what they will get, or experience, when they use a product or service. Today, organisations have to protect the promise, that expectation, and make sure that promise is matched by what they actually experience.

Organisations that think more holistically, and focus more in terms of brand than simply advertisements and sales orders, need to ensure the brand image is consistent throughout the whole of the customer’s experience with it. In this context, technical communication, the instructional content that supports users as they use the product or service, becomes an important means of protecting the brand.

That’s because, when the customer has left the store, all the packaging has thrown away, and the customer is actually using the product, one of the few things left to sustain the brand’s reputation is technical communication – the User Assistance, the technical documentation. This will help support the user through the periods they spend using of that product or service.

Trends in technical communication – the funny airline safety video

The airline safety video is about actions that could save your life, but it can be very dull and mundane if you’ve flown more than once. So airlines are using the third aspect in good design – emotion – to engage with their audience.

The latest video to follow this trend is from Delta Airlines:

Other examples are:

Atlassian no longer lets users comment on its documentation – good or bad news?

Last week, Atlassian sent out this message on Twitter:

This was a surprise, as Atlassian has been a strong advocate for having user comments appended to user documentation. Sarah Maddox, when she was working at Atlassian, posted the reasons why the company encouraged comments on her personal blog:

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Webinar recording of the changing nature of technical content

STC France-TCeurope has published a recording of Ellis’ webinar presentation on the changing nature of technical content. The presentation lasted 50 minutes, followed by 10 minutes of questions and answers: