Getting users to read the Help rather than call support

We spotted an interesting statement by the “Father of Behaviour Design”, BJ Fogg: “For somebody to do something – whether it’s buying a car, checking an email, or doing 20 press-ups – three things must happen at once. The person must want to do it, they must be able to, and they must be prompted to… Read more »

Using Hemingway on our website

Last week, we used the Hemingway app to highlight any unclear pages on our main website. The app highlighted four pages where we’d used the passive voice or very long sentences. The first inclination was to think our readers are cleverer, our content is more technical, it’s not possible to rewrite those parts. We found, of course, we… Read more »

Reducing the reading age for our website

Following on from James Mathewson’s  presentation at Content Strategy 17, we’ve been reflecting on Cherryleaf’s main website, and the improvements we could make to it. One thing we have started to do is reduce the reading age for the content. Reading age measures are also, in effect, readability measures. So any improvements also benefit people… Read more »

Common sense isn’t always common

Here’s some examples from Munich of what might seem to obvious and common sense to the one audience, but not to others. Traffic lights that have four lights, with the symbols –, O, I and K: Pedestrian crossing lights that have two people instead of one: The second set of lights is still comprehendible (hold… Read more »

The sad case of GDS and the tax manuals

The UK’s Government Digital Service has been doing great work in putting users’ needs before the needs of government, so it was a shock to see the revised tax manuals the GDS and HMRC published recently. In the GDS blog post, First HMRC manual on GOV.UK – give us your feedback, Till Worth explained: “HMRC has built a new… Read more »